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Columbia University Digital Knowledge Ventures The Architecture and Development of New York City with Andrew S. Dolkart
image The Public Realm Early Private Buildings
Snug Harbor
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Early Private Buildings
Snug Harbor
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Much more common in the early decades of the nineteenth century were privately funded institutional buildings. Since the city did not invest in education or in social service, it was private groups that did this. And so some of the great institutional buildings of the early nineteenth century are those that were built through private philanthropy.

Sailors' Snug Harbor on Staten Island, one of America's greatest Greek-revival-style institutional complexes, was a private philanthropy that was built as a safe, snug harbor for retired seamen, and was originally supposed to be on Washington Square but was moved to the north shore of Staten Island and had income that derived from rents from the Washington Square property.

This was designed in the 1830s by the very prominent architect Minard Lefever, and was designed to create this grand institutional image for Sailors' Snug Harbor.

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